Brown dwarf star in our solar system

Michael Breen

Brown Dwarf star in our solar system orbiting around the Sun.

It’s Friday afternoon and I’m winding down from the work week by surfing my usual news sites when I came across the headline Earth under attack from Death Star. Well that piqued my attention, so I click on the link and check it out. These were words that jumped out at me immediately – “The brown dwarf star (five times the size of Jupiter), which scientists have named Nemesis is believed to be orbiting around our sun”. Wow, now that’s news. A brown dwarf star in our solar system huh? That’s a bit of a game changer. So now we are living a binary star system? That’s taking duality to another level. I’ve linked to all the relevant content if you’re unfamiliar with this, but many of you might react in a similar way to me.

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The Binary Research Institute is an organisation in the US that has been studying the effects on earth from the precession of the equinox. They have spent a great deal of time and money researching the binary solar system theory – Brown Dwarf and all. I highly recommend you checking it out for yourself.

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On 21st December 2012 at 11:11am GMT the sun will align perfectly with the galactic plane (or equator) of the Milky Way galaxy. Essentially the sun will fill the eye of the galaxy. This event, according to the ancient Mayan civilisation, represents the end of one age and the beginning of another, while astrologers are referring to this event as the Cardinal T-square. At the same time the earth’s wobble will position our planet in such a way where the north node pole will be directly aimed towards the sign of Capricorn at zero degrees – the Age of Aquarius? There’s just so much going on at this time in the heavens that can’t be ignored. Brown Dwarf or not, things could get interesting.

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Brown dwarf star in our solar system | Michael Breen | Karmic Ecology.

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Days on Venus Are Longer

Feb 20, 2012; 1:24 AM ET

Using an infrared camera to see through the thick atmosphere of Venus, scientists recently discovered an interesting change.

Some known surface features were displaced by around 12 miles from where they were, as measured by NASA’s Magellan orbiter in the early 1990s. This change is distance means that days on Venus are about 6-7 minutes longer than they were about 20 years ago.

This could be important information if we ever want to explore Venus so that landing sites could be selected and then tracked.

Why are the days getting longer? The most logical hypothesis is that Venus’s very dense atmosphere, which is more than 90 times the pressure of Earth’s, interacts with high-speed weather systems found on the planet. This may change the planet’s rotation rate due to friction with the surface.

via AccuWeather.com – Astronomy | Days on Venus Are Longer.

NASA’s NPP Satellite Acquires First VIIRS Image

11.22.11

An image taken by the NPP Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on Nov. 21, 2011. This high-resolution image is wrapped on a globe and shows a broad swath of Eastern North America from Canada’s Hudson Bay past Florida to the northern coast of Venezuela. The NASA NPP Team at the Space Science and Engineering Center, UW-Madison created the image using 3 channels (red, green and blue) of VIIRS data. Credit: NASA/NPP Team

GREENBELT, Md. — The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard NASA’s newest Earth-observing satellite, NPP, acquired its first measurements on Nov. 21, 2011. This high-resolution image is of a broad swath of Eastern North America from Canada’s Hudson Bay past Florida to the northern coast of Venezuela. The VIIRS data were processed at the NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF) in Suitland, Md.

VIIRS is one of five instruments onboard the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite that launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., on Oct. 28. Since then, NPP reached its final orbit at an altitude of 512 miles (824 kilometers), powered on all instruments and is traveling around the Earth at 16,640 miles an hour (eight kilometers per second).

“This image is a next step forward in the success of VIIRS and the NPP mission,” said James Gleason, NPP project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

VIIRS will collect radiometric imagery in visible and infrared wavelengths of the Earth’s land, atmosphere, and oceans. By far the largest instrument onboard NPP, VIIRS weighs about 556 pounds (252 kilograms). Its data, collected from 22 channels across the electromagnetic spectrum, will be used to observe the Earth’s surface including fires, ice, ocean color, vegetation, clouds, and land and sea surface temperatures.

“VIIRS heralds a brightening future for continuing these essential measurements of our environment and climate,” said Diane Wickland, NPP program scientist at NASA headquarters in Washington. She adds that all of NPP’s five instruments will be up and running by mid-December and NPP will begin 2012 by sending down complete data.

“NPP is right on track to ring in the New Year,” said Ken Schwer, NPP project manager at NASA Goddard. “Along with VIIRS, NPP carries four more instruments that monitor the environment on Earth and the planet’s climate, providing crucial information on long-term patterns to assess climate change and data used by meteorologists to improve short-term weather forecasting.”

NPP serves as a bridge mission from NASA’s Earth Observing System (EOS) of satellites to the next-generation Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) program that will also collect weather and climate data. NASA Goddard manages the NPP mission for the Earth Science Division of the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The JPSS program provides the NPP ground system and NOAA provides operational support.

During NPP’s five-year life, the mission will extend more than 30 key long-term datasets that include measurements of the atmosphere, land and oceans. NASA has been tracking many of these properties for decades. NPP will continue measurements of land surface vegetation, sea surface temperature, and atmospheric ozone that began more than 25 years ago.

“The task now for the science community is to evaluate VIIRS performance and determine the accuracy of its data products,” said Chris Justice a professor of geography at the University of Maryland, College Park, who will be using VIIRS data in his research.

“These long-term data records are critical in monitoring how the Earth’s surface is changing – either from human activity or through climate change.”

NASA’s NPP mission will continue collecting critical climate data to help scientist unravel the mysteries of climate change. NPP is carrying five instruments on board. The biggest and most important instrument is The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite or VIIRS. This video focuses on VIIRS and why it is so important to Earth’s science.

Goddard Release No. 11-083

Rani Gran
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
301-286-2483
Rani.C.Gran@nasa.gov

John Leslie
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, Md.
301-713-0214
john.leslie@noaa.gov

via NASA – NASA’s NPP Satellite Acquires First VIIRS Image.